Friday, April 20, 2012

Introduction to The Crotch Reporter


My name is Jen.  I am human.  I have feelings, emotions, and thoughts.  I also have a disease called endometriosis (en-doh-mee-tree-OH-suhs). Although I believe I have suffered from this disease since at least the age of 12, when I started menstruating, I was not diagnosed until I was 34.   Endometriosis is a disease that is widely misunderstood.  It is pervasive, affecting approximately 10% of women or 176 million girls and women worldwide (Please see the Endometriosis Research Center at http://www.endocenter.org/ for more information).  Yet, Firefox does not recognize its correct spelling and provokes me to change it with its red squiggly underline.  I am really considering writing or calling Mozilla about this issue.  Are you listening Mitchell Baker??? Time listed you as one of the most influential people in the world in 2005.  You are a woman.  Yet, the product that you helped market as an alternative to Microshaft IE does not recognize the word, endometriosis.  I am losing respect for your product as I write.

I cannot remember the number of doctors I have been to in my lifetime to report the debilitating symptoms, most notably PAIN, of endometriosis.  Yet, it took 22 years for these numbskulls to diagnose me.  (More on these various numbskulls later...)  I am starting this blog to document my struggle and my journey.  It will primarily revolve around my experiences with this illness. I have other interests, so I will occasionally write entries about them too.  This blog is an attempt to reclaim the humanity that endometriosis and countless doctors robbed.  This blog is crotch journalism.  There are other crotch journalists reporting in wonderful and varied ways.  I am thankful for them as they have inspired me to find my crotch's voice. 

I must credit a thoughtful and wonderful colleague of mine who asked for a crotch report yesterday.  Here is my crotch report for today:

I have no kidney stones and no UTI (Urinary Tract Infection).  I was hoping that the primarily left-sided pelvic pain, flank pain, and pain under my ribs was (a) kidney stone(s).  It is sad when you are hoping for kidney stones. I went to a urologist yesterday who tested my piss and did an ultrasound of my kidneys. Ironically, I was reading about the Rolling Stones in Keith Richard's Life as I waited for an hour to see the urologist. I'm still waiting on one culture that was sent off to a lab.  I don't expect it to be cloudy.  That ends today's crotch report.
Signing off,
Jen Pem

9 comments:

  1. I know very little of this but knowledge is power so I'm in.

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  3. I have no idea. LOL. They just showed up when I started! Dave may have a better idea about this.

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  4. From Dave (I don't know why it didn't show up here???):
    1) Go to www.addthis.com, this is where you'll be able to get the HTML code for the share buttons.
    2) To the right of the page you'll see three radial buttons with three examples of the share buttons available. Choose one of the three.
    3) Click on the orange button that says "Get AddThis"
    4) It will prompt you to register but this is not necessary to get the HTML code for just hit the "X" on the top right hand corner of the window to close the register button.
    5) You'll now see a box with the HTML code in it, click the blue button that says "Grab It". This will copy the HTML code to your computer's clipboard.

    You can add the share buttons to either the sidebar of your main blog page or to each individual blog post or both if you wish.

    6) To add the share buttons to your main blog page. Go to your blog and click on DESIGN>LAYOUT
    7) Click on "Add a Gadget" wherever you want the share buttons to be located at.
    8) You want to add the gadget titled "HTML/JavaScript". Click on the gadget.
    9) Give it a title, this will be shown above the buttons.
    10) Paste the code into the box labeled "Content" and Save
    11) View your blog, the buttons should be there now.

    If you want to add the share buttons to each individual blog post then just go to your post listings and edit the post in HTML mode and paste the code under your text for the post.

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  6. Hi Jenn..I know your brother (won't out him by saying his name here). And I posted this on my Facebook a bit ago: So, the doctor that does various TV bits on Channel 13's health section just said that women who undergo radical treatment of endometriosis by removing all of their reproductive parts are no longer women. They are just people who can't reproduce. Huh? WTF????

    Your bro went nuts. Told us of you and your struggles. My other friends chimed in. Then you send a text to your brother that you are in the hospital dealing with this. I'm so sorry. I fired off an email to the so called doctor journalist about his ridiculous comment a few minutes ago. How could he something so unfeeling?

    Unbelievable. Get better girlie!

    Sherri

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  7. Jen...Sorry for the typos (particulary the misspelling of your name). It's rather late, but one more thing. Here's the ONLINE article about what the good doc was on about, but of course, his slip of the tongue doesn't appear here: http://cfnews13.com/content/news/cfnews13/news/article.html/content/news/articles/bn9/2012/5/31/priority_health_endo.html

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    1. Thanks Sherri! I'm trying to get better. The other thing that burns me more than "people who can't reproduce" bit is that the outright myth and lie that a hysterectomy "cures" endometriosis. WRONG. Endometriosis is by definition, endometrium-like tissue found OUTSIDE the uterus. And, the ovaries are not even the most common place endo is found. So, taking out parts does not get rid of the endometriosis unless endometriosis is excised completely from wherever it is found. It has been found on the outside of reproductive organs, on the bowel, on the pelvic sidewalls, the diaphragm, and virtually almost anywhere in the body, although it is most common in the pelvic region.

      And, people just don't get how painful it is. The pain is on par with the pain of a ruptured appendix.

      I'm home from the hospital. But, I was bleeding out and had to get more sutures for my vaginal cuff. Thanks for the link.

      Also, I would like to invite you to the best on-line support and information group there is at the Endometriosis Research Center facebook closed-group if you have endo. I think you can search for it and ask to be added. It has been a life-line for me with worldclass endometriosis experts and others who have the disease who really do understand what it is like. I'm going to share this with them if you don't mind. :)

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    2. If you don't find it, we can be facebook friends, and I can get you added. Search for my email jpemberton76@gmail.com.

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